Tag: flossing

Toothpaste, toothbrush and floss

Talking toothbrushes, water picks and more

With all the various dental products available to consumers, keeping your teeth healthy and clean has never been easier, once you can determine what dental hygiene routine is best for you.

Toothbrushes have come a long way since the days of the “chew stick,” a twig featuring a frayed end, or the hog bristle toothbrushes of the Tang Dynasty (619-907). But with so many options, it’s easy to wonder if you’re using the correct one.

Power up—Many people have turned to electric toothbrushes for that fresh out-of-the-chair feeling while others maintain their pearly whites using a hand-powered toothbrush. Manual brushing can deliver about 500 strokes per minute while an electric toothbrush averages 3,000 strokes per minute. Each option offers the ability to loosen food particles from on and between teeth.

Bring on the bristle—Whether you use a manual or powered toothbrush, you will need to determine what type bristles will whisk away plaque and grime. Most teeth will do well with soft bristles; and those with sensitive teeth and signs of enamel erosion, might prefer extra-soft bristles. Hard bristle brushes wear away enamel and are usually not recommended by dentists.

Toothbrushes are not the only tool for keeping teeth, gums and smiles healthy. Here is a rundown on additional oral care options.

Don’t be a fussy flosser—The art of flossing is important in the fight against tooth decay and gum disease. In addition to the tried and true box of floss, there are flossing products that incorporate holders, picks or sticks to help with flossing. There is no difference between flossing before or after brushing, as long as its done daily.

Pick it up—Water picks are becoming increasingly popular, especially with people wearing braces or have other dental additions like crowns or bridgework. Water picks are also easier to use for those suffering from arthritis. Water picks are easy to use and can get to hard-to-reach areas with greater easy.

Tip of the tongue—For fresher breath, many people turn to the tried and true method of tongue scraping to remove bacteria from the tongue. Some studies have found that tongue scraping can lead to an improved sense of taste and tongue appearance. Concaved tongue scrapers come in a variety of materials.

Have questions about good oral health habits or dental products? Ask Dr. Baker or one of his professional team members during your next visit.

Prevent bad breath with good oral hygiene

Worried about bad breath? You’re not alone. 50% of adults have had bad breath, or halitosis, at some point in their lives. Bad breath can get in the way of your social life. It can make you self-conscious and embarrassed. Fortunately, there are simple and effective ways to freshen your breath.

  1. Floss daily. Need another reason to floss your teeth at least once a day? Flossing daily helps improve bad breath by effectively removing the food particles and bacteria that contribute to it. That makes flossing one of the easiest ways to prevent and banish bad breath.
  1. Scrape your tongue. The coating that normally forms on the tongue can harbor foul-smelling bacteria. To eliminate them, gently brush your tongue with your toothbrush, or, better yet, use a tongue scraper. They’re designed to apply even pressure across the surface of the tongue area, removing bacteria, food debris, and dead cells.
  1. Drink more water. Drink plenty of water to help maintain the level of saliva in your mouth to help prevent bad breath in addition to following a good oral care routine. After eating, swishing your mouth with plain water also helps freshen your breath by eliminating food particles.
  1. Kick the habit. Bad breath is just one of many reasons not to smoke. Smoking damages gum tissue and stains teeth. It also increases your risk of oral cancer. Talk to your doctor about smoking cessation programs that can help you give up tobacco for good.
  1. Skip after-dinner mints and chew gum instead. Sugary candies promote the growth of bacteria in your mouth and add to bad breath problems. Instead, chew sugarless gum, which stimulates saliva … the mouth’s natural defense against plaque acids.

Sources: American Dental Association WebMD, Oral-B

Guide to dental floss

If there’s one thing my patients need to do more of, it’s floss. Regular flossing removes plaque buildup between teeth that a toothbrush can’t reach, preventing gum disease.

Types of dental floss:

  • Unwaxed floss—a thin nylon floss made of about 35 strands twisted together. It fits into tight spaces if your teeth are close together, but it can be prone to shredding or breaking.
  • Waxed floss—a standard nylon floss with a light wax coating. It is less likely to break, but the wax coating may make it harder to use in tight spots.
  • Dental tape—broader and flatter than standard floss and comes in waxed or unwaxed versions. People with more space between their teeth often find dental tape more comfortable to use than traditional floss.

Using a “flosser”

If you have trouble reaching the back of your mouth or gripping traditional floss, try a flosser. A flosser is basically a piece of floss on a handle. Like toothbrushes, flossers come in a variety of shapes and colors (even battery-powered!). Look for one with a long handle for easier holding and a compact head that makes it easier to reach behind the back teeth—a particularly tricky spot to clean. Dental flossers also come in a variety of kid-friendly colors and cartoon characters.

The best type of dental floss is the one that is most comfortable for you. The easier to use, the more likely the patient will floss on a regular basis.

Source: Oral B