Tag: tips

Keeping your child’s smile healthy

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month. Start practicing good dental health habits when they are young. Here are a few tips to keep your child’s smile healthy:

  • Avoid giving your child sweetened liquids
  • Brush your child’s teeth twice a day and floss once a day
  • Make sure your child gets enough fluoride
  • Start regular dental visits by age 3
  • Ask your dentist for advice on sealants and mouth guards
  • Keep your dentist informed of any changes in your child’s health
  • Set a good example for your child!

Patients often tell me they have a hard time getting their young children to brush their teeth. It doesn’t have to be a battle each time. Here are some ideas to try with your kids:

  • Start young. Toddlers love to imitate their parents. Give them a toothbrush and sit with your child on the bathroom floor so he/she can watch you use a toothbrush and try to copy it.
  • Have your child brush the teeth of their stuffed animal or doll.
  • Make it fun! Sign a song, read a story, turn it into a game.*
  • Let your child practice brushing your teeth, while you brush his or hers.
  • Have your child pick out their own toothbrush and toothpaste at the store.
  • Children learn from example. If they see that you are taking good care of your teeth they will want to do the same.

*See 7 Toothbrushing Tunes Kids (and Parents) Will Love from the American Dental Association (ADA).

 

Are you using the right toothpaste?

Choices, choices, choices! Some toothpastes provide whitening enhancement, some guard against sensitivity and some protect against the effects of acid wear, and the list gets longer.

Toothpastes don’t merely clean teeth anymore. Different types have special ingredients. Many adults have, or are at risk of having, some form of gingivitis. It is a benefit to use a toothpaste that contains fluoride plus an antibacterial ingredient. Some toothpastes can also fight germs for 12 hours.

Here are a few tips on picking the right toothpaste:

  • Look for the American Dental Association (ADA) seal to see if that toothpaste meets your specific oral health needs.
  • If you have sensitive teeth, look for toothpaste without heavy abrasives. Try a desensitizing paste with either strontium chloride or potassium nitrate as an added ingredient.
  • Toothpaste with “tarter control” on the label won’t remove tarter, however studies have shown it will reduce tarter formation up to 36 percent.
  • Toothpaste with “baking soda” is less abrasive and will reduce sensitivity if you have gum recession or eroded teeth due to rigorous brushing with abrasive toothpaste.
  • If you’ve had your teeth whitened, try a whitening toothpaste, which helps maintain the tooth shade. Look for ingredients carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide.
  • Children under 3 are more likely to swallow toothpaste, so they should brush with a non fluoride toothpaste. Once they are able to spit, switch to a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Most toothpastes for children come in fruit and bubble mint flavors. Fruit flavor is most popular, while bubble mint can seem “too spicy” or “hot” for some kids.
  • Choose a toothpaste that tastes and feels best for you.
  • Still have questions? Ask us at your next hygiene visit and we will help you make the right choice.

Tips for a cavity-free Halloween

It is hard to resist the sugary treats and candy that seem to appear out of nowhere each October. You don’t have to deprive yourself in order to protect your teeth because Dr. Baker has some tips to keep your smile cavity-free.

Try to avoid the sticky, chewy, hard and crunchy treats. Soft and sticky candies stick to the teeth, giving the decay-causing bacteria time to decay your teeth. Hard candies dissolve slowly in your mouth, coating your teeth with sugar for a long period of time. They can also chip your teeth and cause choking in younger children.

Some Halloween candy alternatives:

  • Animal crackers
  • Pretzels
  • Stickers or temporary tattoos
  • Pencils, pens or erasers
  • Small packs of crayons
  • Bubbles
  • Plastic jewelry
  • Play-Doh
  • Lip balm

Tips for getting rid of bad breath

Bad breath can be embarrassing. It can get in the way of our professional and social lives. If you suffer from bad breath, you are not alone.

Here are some helpful tips from WebMD:

  1. Brush and floss more frequently. The prime cause of bad breath is plaque. It will build up on your teeth and in between teeth, making an ideal place for bacteria to grow. Brush at least twice a day, and floss at least once a day to prevent the buildup of plaque.
  2. Scrape your tongue. The coating that forms on your tongue can contain foul smelling bacteria. You can brush your tongue with a toothbrush or use a tongue scraper to clean it.
  3. Avoid foods that sour your breath. Foods like onions and garlic are the worst offenders. They can make their way into your bloodstream and to your lungs where you breathe them out. It is best to avoid these foods before events when you want to be sure your breath is fresh.
  4. Kick the habit. Smoking will no doubt cause bad breath, as well as other oral health problems. You’ll notice a huge difference after you quit.
  5. Rinse your mouth. Using mouthwash will freshen your breath and help get rid of bacteria in your mouth. If you don’t have mouthwash handy, simply rinse with water after eating to remove food particles.
  6. Chew gum instead of mints. Sugary mints will only promote bacteria growth in the mouth. Gum (especially sugarless) stimulates saliva production, which is a natural defense against bacteria.
  7. Keep your gums healthy. Gum disease is a common cause of bad breath. Regular brushing and flossing will prevent gum disease and keep them healthy.
  8. Be aware of dry mouth. Lack of saliva promotes tooth decay and bad breath. If your mouth is feeling dry, drink some water or chew sugarless gum (or mints). Be sure to tell your dentist if you are experiencing persistent dry mouth.
  9. See your dentist. If your bad breath continues be sure to see your dentist. It could be a symptom of a medical condition such as a sinus infection, lung infection, liver or kidney disease.

Guide to dental floss

If there’s one thing my patients need to do more of, it’s floss. Regular flossing removes plaque buildup between teeth that a toothbrush can’t reach, preventing gum disease.

Types of dental floss:

  • Unwaxed floss—a thin nylon floss made of about 35 strands twisted together. It fits into tight spaces if your teeth are close together, but it can be prone to shredding or breaking.
  • Waxed floss—a standard nylon floss with a light wax coating. It is less likely to break, but the wax coating may make it harder to use in tight spots.
  • Dental tape—broader and flatter than standard floss and comes in waxed or unwaxed versions. People with more space between their teeth often find dental tape more comfortable to use than traditional floss.

Using a “flosser”

If you have trouble reaching the back of your mouth or gripping traditional floss, try a flosser. A flosser is basically a piece of floss on a handle. Like toothbrushes, flossers come in a variety of shapes and colors (even battery-powered!). Look for one with a long handle for easier holding and a compact head that makes it easier to reach behind the back teeth—a particularly tricky spot to clean. Dental flossers also come in a variety of kid-friendly colors and cartoon characters.

The best type of dental floss is the one that is most comfortable for you. The easier to use, the more likely the patient will floss on a regular basis.

Source: Oral B

Taking care of teeth at work

On average, we spend a third of our day at work. While at work, we eat lunch and often grab a snack from the vending machine or birthday cake from the lunchroom. Do you clean your teeth during the long workday? Here are a few tips for keeping your smile healthy at the workplace:

  • Keep a toothbrush and toothpaste in your desk, locker or lunchbox and brush after eating.Or try the single-use toothbrushes, preloaded with toothpaste (Ex: Colgate Wisps).
  • If you are embarrassed to brush your teeth at work, try rinsing your mouth with mouthwash.
  • Chewing sugarless gum will increase saliva production and neutralize acids in the mouth that cause tooth decay.